Honors College Office of the Provost

Honors College Courses

 
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Honors Academic Courses


Honors University Core

Student can earn honors credit by taking the Honors version of their required University Core courses.

Example: Students can take Honors World Literature before 1600 as their required core literature course or Honors Calculus I as their required core math course.

*Please note that Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, CLEP, ACT/SAT, and dual-enrollment credits while accepted as Auburn credits will not be accepted as Honors College credits.*

Honors Departmental

Students may choose to complete the Honors version of major specific, departmental courses.

Example: Student who are required by their major, or minor, to take Organic Chemistry can opt to take the Honors version of Organic Chemistry or students who are majoring or minoring in a business based field can take Honors Principles of Accounting to fill a requirement while receiving honors credit.

*Please note that some courses have prerequisites.*

Honors Interdisciplinary

Interdisciplinary core courses offered by the Honors College are specialized classes available to Honors students each semester. These classes are distinguished from traditional courses by utilizing a strong emphasis on cultivating new methods of thinking and communicating ideas. These interdisciplinary core courses involve engaging and enriching class discussions requiring in-depth thinking and reasoning. As part of Auburn University’s land grant mission these classes impart the knowledge, skills, and values so essential to education and the creation of responsible citizens on both a local and global scale.

Example: Student who take Technology and Culture I & II examine the intersections of technology and culture in a variety of social, historical, and professional contexts. Students explore how humans use technology to shape their environment, discuss how technologies are understood and used by diverse people around the globe, investigate the forces behind technological and cultural change, and study the relationship between technology and science.

Honors Study and Travel

Honors Study and Travel, HONR 3087, is a course designed to inform students about a specific country abroad or a region within the United States. Students study the culture and history of the destination throughout the semester and then travel to that destination as the culminating experience for the course.

Example: History professor, Dr. Sippial, taught a small group of honors student about Cuban culture and history. Once the semester ended, the students took a trip to Cuba to explore the subject matters they studied during the regular semester. This a great opportunity to study abroad if you want to go on a shorter trip or you have a curriculum that doesn’t allow you to be off campus for a whole semester.

Honors Seminars

Honors Seminars, HONR 3007, are taught in small discussion groups similar to graduate courses. Students are not required to have a background in the topic, only possess an interest in the material. Seminar topics vary and are announced each semester. These courses count towards graduation as elective hours.

Example: The Global Citizenship course focuses on students discovering the answer to “what does it mean to be a global citizen?”

Honors Research Seminars

Honors Research Seminars, HONR 3987, provide Honors students with a research experience under the close supervision of an Auburn faculty member. The course is designed to enable a faculty member to mentor a number of students who are working on collaborative research. Research Seminar course topics vary and are announced each semester.

Examples: Marine Research students enjoyed the opportunity to research in and out of the lab live coral reef organisms (sea anemones, shrimps, fishes) from the Caribbean Sea. During spring break, these students take a trip to the Florida keys to conduct field surveys, and go on snorkeling trips to collect samples of the organizms they have been researching. The only prerequisite for this class is General Biology. Most students who take this class are not science based majors.

Human Genomics and Personalized Medicine, lead by one of Auburn’s Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology professors, is another popular research seminar. Students have the unique opportunity to learn more about the human genome. This course is great for any students who are pursuing in professional health degrees.

Honors Contract Courses

Honors Contracts enable students to earn credit by incorporating an Honors component within a regularly offered class. This is a great way to customize your Honors experience, form a relationship with your professors, and get the most out of your major or minor classes. Completion of the Honors Contract form with faculty member and department head approval is required and must be submitted by the 15th day of class. Courses that may be contracted include:

    • A core course that cannot be taken as Honors due to a scheduling conflict or lack of an Honors version.
  • A course required to complete the student’s College Curriculum Model.

Honors Participation Courses


Honors Freshmen Exploration, HONR 1077

The Freshmen Exploration course introduces students to Auburn University and the Honors College. Each week, guest speakers present topics relevant to Honors students. Some of the topics discussed include Study Abroad, campus involvement, course registration, National Prestigious Scholarships, service learning, and more.

Honors Lyceum

Every semester the Honors College offers Honors Lyceum classes on varying topics. Always in high demand, the Honors Lyceum provides Honors students with an open forum for discussion of current events, international affairs, and controversial issues. Subject matter for the course varies from semester to semester, but has recently focused on such issues as: world hunger, the reform of undergraduate education in the United States, service learning, faculty research on the Auburn campus, and cultural learning experiences.

Examples: Project Horseshoe Farms Tutoring is a remote tutoring program where honors students tutor middle schoolers from Greensboro, Alabama in math and reading via skype. The honors students are paired with the same middle schooler every week in an effort to make an impactful connection, all while helping the student with their academic pursuits.

Times on Tuesday is another honors lyceum for students interested in current events. Each week the students read the New York Times and come together for discussion on the week’s biggest topics.

Honors Book Club

During the semester students typically read two to three books and actively participate in class discussions.

These classes are typically taught by higher administers and faculty on campus who come from all disciplines of the University. The books read are hand-picked by the instructor and are usually more contemporary.

Honors Forum

Students enrolled in the Forum course select a minimum of ten campus lectures, films, and performances from a pre-approved list to attend. The events span a wide range of subjects and students submit a reflective essay after each event attended.

This class is a great way for students to engage in the vast array of opportunities provided by the University and its partners while earning honors credit.

Honors Senior Year Experiences


Honors Research

Students work with a departmental professor in their major or minor to complete a project of their choosing.

Typically, students will participate in honors research their junior or senior year. For majors that require research, you can take the honors version of research and meet both your requirement and receive honors credit.

Honors Thesis

Students work with a departmental professor in their major or minor to complete a project of their choosing and produce a written document or oral presentation.

Honors thesis is a wonderful option for any student who wants the experience of writing an undergraduate thesis. Writing a thesis benefits both students preparing to attend professional or graduate school, as well as those entering directly into the workforce.

Honors Special Topics

Students work with a departmental professor in their major or minor to complete a project of their choosing. Honors Contract courses in the major field of study at the 4000-5000 level Students may contract courses in their major field of study by incorporating an Honors component within a regularly offered class.

This course is very similar to Honors Research. It gives students an opportunity to work one on one with a professor on a project that is interesting to them.

Graduate-level courses in the major field of study

Students who meet the required pre-requisites may take graduate-level courses within their field of study. A maximum of twelve of these hours may count towards both the student’s undergraduate and graduate degrees at Auburn University. These graduate courses tend to be 6000 level courses that bridge undergraduate and graduate level courses.

Course Listing | Fall 2021

*Click the green Open button for more information

HONR Course Listing

DescriptionSubjectCourseSecCreditsTitleDaysTimeCapInstructorModality
Counts as a core Social Science course specifically designed for Honors College students. From an interdisciplinary perspective, this course examines the intersections of technology & technology & culture in a variety of social, historical, professional, and global settings.HONR100713Honors Tech and Culture IMWF11:00 AM-11:50 AM22George Plasketes
Counts as a core Social Science course specifically designed for Honors College students. Sustainability & the Modern World I provides an interdisciplinary exploration into the concept of sustainability as theory and practice with a focus on issues related to food and water. The course exposes students to systems of thinking, and invites them to think critically about the interconnectedness of natural, technological, cultural, and economic issues of sustainability.HONR102713Honor Sustainability IMW03:00 PM-04:15 PM25Tessa Carr
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107711Honors Freshman ExplorationM01:00 PM-01:50 PM33Taylor Mitchell
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107721Honors Freshman ExplorationM02:00 PM-02:50 PM33Savannah Woodall
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107731Honors Freshman ExplorationM03:00 PM-03:50 PM33Savannah Woodall
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107741Honors Freshman ExplorationT11:00 AM-11:50 AM33Matthew Stinson
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107751Honors Freshman ExplorationW09:00 AM-09:50 AM33Suzanne Hunter
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107761Honors Freshman ExplorationW02:00 PM-02:50 PM24Whitney Comer
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107771Honors Freshman ExplorationT10:00 AM-10:50 AM33Matthew Stinson
First year course that introduces new Honors College students to the Honors College and Auburn University and helps students become better informed about its resources and services. Topics include Honors College advising, Study Abroad, Campus Involvement, the Career Center, Academic Support and Study Skills, and many more. This course is for first year honors students only.HONR107781Honors Freshman ExplorationR11:00 AM-11:50 AM33Yvette Stone
This course aims to provide a venue for Honors College students selected for the competitive CEO Fellows program to meet on a bi-weekly basis to discuss their progress through the program. We will engage in meaningful conversation about the issues and topics covered within the program—including soft skills, conflict management, team building, and authentic leadership—and reflect upon the assignments being completed. We will also engage any questions that arise during the course of the program and think creatively about how we can apply our leadership skills in service of ourselves, our communities, and our world. Students in the course will complete a leadership project as the final project.HONR108711Honors Lyceum: CEO FellowsT12:30 PM-1:20 PM10Tiffany Sippial
This course provides a continuation of work completed in HONR 1087: CEO Fellows. Student's must have completed CEO Fellows and have permission from Dr. Tiffany Sippial to enroll. HONR108721Honors Lyceum: CEO Fellows LeadershipTBATBATiffany Sippial
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to create long-term, self-sustaining community change by utilizing relevant research to inform their practices. Students will engage their passions to develop artifacts that can be presented through various platforms.HONR108741Honors Lyceum: Translating Research into Social ChangeTime will be added next week, look for updated time in Tiger Scheduler30Courtney Furlong
Students are assigned one season of a television series to watch and analyze during the semester. This is supplemented with both scholarly and pop-culture readings on women in media.HONR108751Honors Lyceum: Women in MediaR12:30-1:20 PM30Victoria Skelton
Students are assigned one season of a television series to watch and analyze during the semester. This is supplemented with both scholarly and pop-culture readings on women in media.HONR108761Honors Lyceum: Women in MediaW02:00 PM-02:50 PM30Victoria Skelton
In this course students are expected to conduct 15 hours of service and do an in-class presentation on their service experience. This class will meet 4-6 times during the semester, but most of your weekly meeting times will be canceled, allowing for community service time. HONR108771Honors Lyceum: Service LearningM03:00 PM-03:50 PM30Taylor Mitchel
You've taken personality assessments, or at least heard of them, but what do they really do? How can you use them to your benefit? In this course students will take learning and personality assessments, explore the results, and discuss how to apply the finds to the real-world. Some of the assessments included in the course will be the Enneagram, type focus, true colors, etc. HONR108781Honors Lyceum: Learning YOU through Assessment W10:00 AM-10:50 AM28Suzanne Hunter
In this Lyceum the speakers will discuss their involvement in research within their particular field. This is a great class to introduce you to research opportunities on Auburn's campus, and explore the different types of research that contributes to our R1 status. HONR1087101Honors Lyceum: Research at AuburnW09:00-9:50 AM20Robert Kulick
This course is connected to the Honors Peer Mentorship Program. The program is a lifeline for incoming Honors College freshmen to help ease the transition into the Honors College and university life by grouping new students with experienced upperclassmen. New students have a contact from the first day they arrive on campus to help them navigate this new step in their lives. Mentors are paired with a small group of first year students with whom they interact throughout the summer and fall semester. Students must apply to be a mentor. HONR1087131Honors Lyceum: Honors Peer MentorsT03:30 PM-04:45 PM0Whitney Comer
In this Lyceum the speakers will discuss their involvement in research within their particular field. This is a great class to introduce you to research opportunities on Auburn's campus, and explore the different types of research that contributes to our R1 status. HONR1087141Honors Lyceum: Research at AuburnM01:00 AM-01:50 PM20Robert Kulick
Career Success assists students who have selected an academic major and who are beginning internship or full-time job searches, or who are making decisions on graduate and professional school. The course is designed to help students in developing a career plan and investigating the work world in terms of the students' career/life goals. Students will learn the dynamics of decision-making, the importance of gaining experience in their field of interest, and job search skills. They will engage in career research, resume writing, portfolio development, interviewing, networking and other career development practices. The transition from college student to professional will be discussed including first year on the job advice, finances, relocations, and adjustment.HONR1087D011Honors Lyceum: Career SuccessW01:00 PM-01:50 PM30Tasheila Williams-TownsendOnline Sychronous
Career Success assists students who have selected an academic major and who are beginning internship or full-time job searches, or who are making decisions on graduate and professional school. The course is designed to help students in developing a career plan and investigating the work world in terms of the students' career/life goals. Students will learn the dynamics of decision-making, the importance of gaining experience in their field of interest, and job search skills. They will engage in career research, resume writing, portfolio development, interviewing, networking and other career development practices. The transition from college student to professional will be discussed including first year on the job advice, finances, relocations, and adjustment.HONR1087D021Honors Lyceum: Career SuccessT11:00 AM-11:50 AM30Addye Buckley-BurnellOnline Sychronous
The "Exploring Innovation" Lyceum course will give students a chance to participate in forum discussions on innovation. The course will cover different types of innovation with real-world examples. Students will learn not only how to recognize innovation, but also how to implement innovations themselves. HONR1087D031Honors Lyceum: Exploring InnovationR02:00 PM-03:15 PM30Bob Sesek Online Sychronous
We often discuss the importance of “leadership” in different contexts. You might be asked to describe your leadership experience in an organization, or to recount a time when you led a team. In the corporate world, success or failure of a team or company is often attributed to how “good” or “bad” the leadership of the group is. But what makes a leader? Are leaders born or made? How do we define “good” and “bad” leadership? In this course, we will explore the foundations of leadership to provide you with the basic tools needed to start on your own leadership journey.HONR1087D041Honors Lyceum: Foundations of LeadershipT06:00 PM-06:50 PM10Sean BittnerOnline Sychronous
This course is a fun and rewarding way to help Freshman Honors students AND give back to the Honors College. Peer Instructors are assigned to one of the Freshman Exploration sections. There is a separate application to be a peer instructor. Interested in this opportunity? You can apply for this position by filling out the online Peer Instructor Application (https://auburn.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6Edq50LY6mOVdvU) on or before April 15th. Questions can be sent to Savannah Woodall: slw0083@auburn.eduHONR1087D051Honors Lyceum: Peer InstructorTBA0Savannah WoodallOnline Asychronous
This course aims to give you a better understanding of how you learn to help you become a better learner in college and throughout your life. In addition to becoming more knowledgeable about the research on teaching and learning, this class will help you reduce anxiety and build confidence in your learning abilities.HONR1087EA11Honors Lyceum: Learning How to LearnT09:30 AM-10:20 AM30Lindsay Doukopoulos
Students attend 10 approved events held around Auburn’s campus or virtually and submit short summaries of their experience online.  Events include research presentations, film screenings, academic seminars, plays, music concerts, lectures, Career Center workshops, etc. HONR2077D011Honors ForumTBATBA75Krista Grant Online Asychronous
Students attend 10 approved events held around Auburn’s campus and submit short summaries of their experience online.  Events include research presentations, film screenings, academic seminars, plays, music concerts, lectures, Career Center workshops, etc. HONR2077D021Honors ForumTBATBA75Krista Grant Online Asychronous
2 Books: The Case Against Education: Why the Education System is a Waste of Time and Money by Bryan Caplan. Princeton University Press. 978-0691174655 and The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students by Anthony Abraham Jack. Harvard University Press. 978-0674248243This course is an Honors book club, focused on leadership and critical thought. This class is designed to help you understand how to think critically about who education is benefiting and if education in its current state is actually worth it. By examining these questions, we will dive deeper into your experiences within Auburn and how these have impacted your leadership philosophy. Books for this course are made available as part of Emerge at Auburn Student Leadership Programs through the generosity of a gift by Dr. Fred & Charlene Kam.HONR208711Honors Book Club: Leadership & Critical ThoughtT09:30 AM-10:20 AM15Alonzo Cee and Jamie Calvert
1. “The Lexus and the Olive Tree” by Thomas Friedman. Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 2 edition (June 15, 2000). ISBN-13: 978-1250013743; ISBN-10: 1250013747; 2. “Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future” by Johan Norberg. Publisher: Oneworld Publications; (July 2017). ISBN-10: 1786070650 ISBN-13: 978-1786070654.HONR208731Honors Book Club: Plugging into the WorldT12:30-1:45 PM15Joseph Johnson
Books will be chosen by the students in the Book Club.HONR208741Honors Book ClubM03:30 PM-04:20 PM12David Housel
Banaji, M. R., & Greenwald, A. G. (2013). Blindspot: Hidden biases of good people. Delacorte PressHONR208761Honors Book Club: Blindspot: Making the Unconscious, ConsciousR2:00 PM- 3:15 PM 15Adeola Olufunlola Fayemi
Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman, 2011, ISBN: 978-0-374-27563-1HONR208771Honors Book Club: Thinking Fast and SlowR09:30 AM-10:45 AM15Alex Sauer
TBAHONR208781Honors Book Club: M11:00-11:50 AM 15Norman Godwin
Viktor Frankl's Man's Search for Meaning and Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha. In this course we will read two texts, one about a person who found a sense of meaning when everything was taken away, and another who could not find meaning despite having everything.HONR2087101Honors Book Club: Meaning Making when Life Seems MeaninglessW04:00-04:50 PM15Alex Huges SCPS
This is a course that fills a need for Honors students to receive a broad instruction to both STEM and Humanities research methodologies to prepare them for future research endeavors. This course is open for all honors students but is required for students pursuing Honors Research Scholar or University Honors Research Scholar.HONR209713Honors Research MethodsMWF09:00 AM-09:50 AM15Toni Carter
Additive manufacturing, or 3d printing, has been gaining popularity since it was first conceived nearly 50 years ago. Technology has progressed to the point where small and portable units are affordable to nearly any consumer. Through a combination of lecture, article discussion and a term project, this course aims to teach the history of 3d printing over the last 50 years with a focus on modern advancements, media perception, and use in popular culture.HONR300713Honors Seminar: 3D PrintingMWF09:00 AM-09:50 AM15Scott D Silvis
This course will prepare students to make more informed job/career decisions and strategies. They will participate in a comprehensive assessment to identify their “motivated” abilities. Using these insights, students will learn about “Goodness of Fit” and how to match their talents to the critical motivations required for both performance and satisfaction in their chosen job/career. Participants will be guided in developing long-term goals, short-term plans, job interviewing skills, mentorship relationships, and co-curricular learning opportunities.HONR300723Honors Seminar: Career Planning: Be the Best YouTR02:00 PM-03:15 PM15Joseph Johnson
Social Advocacy & Ethical Life is addressed to the nature and relationship of ethics and oral forms of expression in a variety of socio-political contexts. Students in the course will have an opportunity to critically investigate theories of ethics and principles of spoken advocacy, and to apply their inquiry in a cumulative series of exercises and performances. Both critical and practical, the work undertaken in this course offers a chance for students to: 1) question the meaning and importance of contemporary calls for civility, engaged citizenship, and deliberation; 2) investigate the roots, power, and limits of ethical discourse and its relevance to social and political decision-making; and 3) develop a working understanding of the principles of social advocacy and the ways in which oral communication constructs, supports, and remakes the grounds of ethical interaction.HONR3007D013Honors Seminar: Urban History: Social Advocacy & Ethical JusticeMWF09:00 AM-09:50 AM15Maurice Robinson Online Sychronous
This course will focus on world music and art that falls outside of the Western European
canon. Primary topics will include the music and art of Africa, Asia, and Central and
South America, the Middle East, Oceania, Australia, and the Caribbean. The broad
survey of these cultures will be complemented by an in-depth capstone research project
on a topic of the student’s choice.
HONR3007D02Honors Seminar: Peer Academic CoachesTBATBA0Yvette Stone Online Asychronous
Since the human genome sequencing was first finished in 2003, our knowledge of genomics and genetic diseases caused by mutations in single or multiple genes have exploded. The future of human and veterinary medicine is individualized treatment. For example, for the same disease, cystic fibrosis, different patients need to be treated differently due to different mutations they harbor. The future of pharmacy practice is also going to be individualized, because the same drug can have different effects based on different genetic makeups of the patients, a branch of science called pharmacogenomics. This course will introduce honors students who are interested in pursuing a career in human or veterinary medicine or pharmacy to some examples of this rapidly expanding field. Methods used in obtaining the knowledge will also be introduced. With this course, the student is expected to have a thorough understanding of the historical and current status of the studies on genomics and personalized medicine.HONR3007EA13Honors Seminar: Genomics and Personalized HealthM02:00 PM-04:30 PM13Ya-Xiong Tao
Honors departmenal permission needed to register. For more infomration contact Whitney Comer wrc0024@auburn.edu. HONR308713Honors Study and Travel: Washington DCW01:00 PM-01:50 PM0Ryan D Williamson
The students will be trained to identify the lacuna / gap in the current research literature associated with an etiopathology of a neurological disease and the pertinent requirement for a new prophylactic or therapeutic drug therapy. Open to all majors. Research focus can be customized to interest and career goals. HONR398713Honors Research Seminar: A novel introduction to "Neuroscience" for the Future Health Care"T02:00 PM-04:30 PM20Muralikrishnan Dhanasekaran
associated with an etiopathology of a neurological disease and the pertinent requirementHONR398723Honors Research Seminar: Selma, Bloody Sunday, and Civil Rights MovementMWF11:00 AM-11:50 AM15Keith S. Hébert and Richard Burt
for a new prophylactic or therapeutic drug therapy.HONR398733Honors Research Seminar: Health for Children and AdolescentsR02:00 PM-04:30 PM15Linda Marie Gibson-Young

Honors Core and Departmental Courses

Available soon, check back often.

Last modified: March 23, 2021